TLD top-level domain

A top-level domain (TLD) identifies the most general part of the domain name in an Internet address. The TLD always follows the last dot in a URL.

A top-level domain (TLD) is the last segment of the domain name. The TLD is the letters immediately following the final dot in an Internet address.

A TLD identifies something about the website associated with it, such as its purpose, the organization that owns it or the geographical area where it originates. Each TLD has a separate registry managed by a designated organization under the direction of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers

ICANN identifies the following categories of TLDs:

Country-code top-level domains (ccTLD) — Each ccTLD identifies a particular country and is two letters long. The ccTLD for the United States, for example, is .us

Infrastructure top-level domain — There is only one TLD in this group, ARPA (Address and Routing Parameter Area). The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) manages this TLD for the IETF.

Sponsored top-level domains (sTLD): These are overseen by private organizations.

Generic top-level domains (gTLD) — These are the most common and familiar TLDs. Examples include “com” for “commercial” and “edu” for “educational.” Most gTLDs are open for registration by anyone, but there is also a subgroup that is more strictly controlled.